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U.S. Navy HM3 Ruben De La Torre, a corpsman with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, posts security during the Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation (MCCRE) on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Sept. 21, 2019. 5th Marines conducted a regimental-sized MCCRE that included 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, and the Regimental Headquarters to increase the combat proficiency and readiness of the regiment. The MCCRE took place over a 10-day period and served as a proof of concept for future regimental-sized MCCREs. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Alexa M. Hernandez)
U.S. Marines and a U.S. Navy Corpsman with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participate in a simulated casualty evacuation during the Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation (MCCRE) on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Sept. 18, 2019. 5th Marines conducted a regimental-sized MCCRE that included 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, and the Regimental Headquarters to increase the combat proficiency and readiness of the regiment. The MCCRE took place over a 10-day period and served as a proof of concept for future regimental-sized MCCREs. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Alexa M. Hernandez)
U.S. Marines with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, hike up a hill during the Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation (MCCRE) on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Sept. 23, 2019. 5th Marines conducted a regimental-sized MCCRE for 1st Battalion, 5th Marines and 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, as well as the Regimental Headquarters to increase the combat proficiency and readiness of the regiment. The MCCRE took place over a 10 day period and served as proof of concept for future regimental-sized MCCREs. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Alexa M. Hernandez)
U.S Marines and Sailors with Echo Company, 2nd battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division conduct Bastard FEX III at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Aug. 14, 2019. Bastard FEX III is an opportunity for the Marines to conduct offensive and defensive operations at the platoon and company levels in preparation for future deployments. (U.S. Marine Corps video by Sgt. Mason Roy)
U.S. Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Shane Armstrong, an artillery cannon operator with 5th Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, checks a stack of M270 rockets during exercise Steel Knight (SK) 19 at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Dec. 7, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Audrey M. C. Rampton)
A U.S. Marine Corps M142 High-mobility artillery rocket system fires a M270 rocket during exercise Steel Knight (SK) 19 at Army Facility Dugway Proving Ground, Utah, Dec. 7, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Audrey M. C. Rampton)
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Ramon Trevino, an infantry Marine with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participates in a decontamination drill during Steel Knight 2019 (SK19) on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., Dec. 06, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
U.S. Marine Corps LCpl. Jeremy Yeager, a machine gunner with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participates in a simulated air assault during Steel Knight 2019 (SK19) on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., Dec. 05, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participate in a simulated air assault during Steel Knight 2019 (SK19) on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., Dec. 05, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Ramon Trevino, an infantry Marine with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participates in a training flight in preparation for Steel Knight 2019 on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., Nov. 27, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
A U.S. Marine with the 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment participates in a training flight in preparation for Steel Knight 2019 on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Nov. 27, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and thinking opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
News
5th Marine Regiment Participates in Apprenticeship with Mercedes-Benz

By Lance Cpl. Alexa M. Hernandez | 1st Marine Division | January 25, 2019

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You can find Marines in any clime and place, but one place you don’t expect to find them is behind the scenes working at a Mercedes-Benz dealership.

Marines with Motor Transport Platoon, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, have been working as apprentices with service technicians from car dealerships in the Southern California region for more than twenty years.

The program began with commanders networking with several dealerships in the local area, said Capt. Alex Read, the logistics officer of 5th Marine Regiment. They were able to set up a partnership with Mercedes-Benz for the latest stage of this program.

The day-long apprenticeship is available to the most technically proficient noncommissioned officers in the regiment, who also display an interest in the program, said Sgt. Alex White, a quality control chief with 5th Marine Regiment. This program is geared toward different approaches to vehicle maintenance, expanding the fundamental training they were taught at motor transport school.

 Motor transport mechanics in the Marine Corps specialize in tactical vehicles, conducting daily preventative maintenance checks and repairs on vehicles such as Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacements (MTVR), Logistic Vehicle Replacements (LVSR), and Humvees.

While observing other service technicians at Mercedes-Benz, the Marines were taught the similarities and differences between maintaining luxury vehicles versus a tactical fleet.

 “Maintaining luxury vehicles as well as tactical vehicles are pretty much the same,” said Cpl. Jensen Runion, a quality control assistant with 5th Marine Regiment, who has attended the program before. “We work on are a bigger version of luxury vehicles and it was surprising how everything from the oil changing, to the tires, rotors, and engine all worked the same so it was easy for me to just dive in to work with them.”

The mission of this program is to get Marines working with vehicles they aren’t quite familiar with, and to strengthen their fundamental knowledge, said Read.

 “We’re creating an environment where we can broaden the Marines’ horizons, and that’s initiative number one,” said Read. “Initiative number two is to entertain and implement creative ideas and solutions on a case by case basis to test them and see if they work. If they do work, then that should absolutely become a part of our standard operating procedures.”

 There have also been significant improvements in the quality of work seen from the entire unit as a result of this training, said Master Sgt. Dale Tilley, the motor transport chief of 5th Marine Regiment.

“The way [Marines] come back and help implement the functionality of the way another shop runs, that has taken our readiness to phenomenal heights,” said Tilley. “We’re able to better support other units because our readiness is at such a high level.”

 Moving forward, the regiment has begun using new techniques they’ve picked up from this program, such as making laminated maintenance packets for each Marine daily that serve as a guideline during the work day, according to White. The packet links service requests to service hours required to complete each task, ensuring each vehicle gets the proper care it needs.

This program is not only great for Marines currently serving, but equally as important for those transitioning out of the Marine Corps looking to pursue a career in mechanics.

 Kenneth Muna, a former member of 5th Marine Regiment, and currently a senior account executive with Before the Movie, Inc., volunteered to participate in the apprenticeship before leaving the Marine Corps.

“My experience with Mercedes-Benz allowed me to quickly gain skills that I could not find anywhere else, said Muna. “It helped me translate my military career into a civilian resume, it gave me direct customer service experience, managerial experience, and more leadership and interview experience.”

Since then, Muna left the Marine Corps, and worked his way to a managerial position in Mercedes-Benz, and is currently expanding to a career in the cinema advertising industry.

 “I recommend that other units look for opportunities like this. The more knowledge you have, the better prepared you’ll be,” said White.


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Jordanian Frogmen, Italian EOD and U.S. Sailors Conduct Multilateral Demolition Operations Training
Task Force 51/5th Marine Expeditionary Brigade
Sept. 1, 2019 | 2:29
CAMP TITIN, JORDAN (September 1, 2019) U.S. Navy Sailors with Task Force 56, Italian EOD and Jordanian Frogmen conducted multilateral demolition operations training in support of Exercise Eager Lion 2019. Eager Lion, U.S. Central Command’s largest and most complex exercise, is an opportunity to integrate forces in a multilateral environment, operate in realistic terrain, and strengthen military-to-military relationships. (U.S. Navy video by LT Ryan Slattery)
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Mission
The 5th Marine Regiment mans, trains and equips battalions, detachments, and individuals to deploy in support of our national security needs while maintaining a high state of readiness and professionally develops our Marines and Sailors to respond to crisis and/or contingencies when the nation calls.
COMMAND PHILOSOPHY

Our unit enjoys a long and distinguished heritage.  Generations of Marines

achieved its status as the Corps' most decorated regiment over a century of

combat in every clime and place.  We will build on the foundation laid by

our predecessors to forge a team that will be successful in combat and add

luster to the regiment's reputation.  The following guidance is intended to

explain my leadership philosophy and orient our individual and collective

energies.

Command Philosophy

5th Marine Regiment Leaders

Col. Rob Weiler
Commanding Officer, 5th Marine Regiment
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Sergeant Major Justin L. Stokes
Sergeant Major, 5th Marine Regiment
VIEW BIO
Contact

5th Marine Regiment
PO BOX 555452
Camp Pendleton, CA 92055-5452

Duty Officer: 
760-763-8066

Camp Pendleton
Directory Assistance:
760-725-4111

UNIT MEMBER EMAIL ACCESS

Share Point Link:  https://eis.usmc.mil/sites/5mar/


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