Featured News

Hammurabi Training Center opens for Iraqi Police

27 Jan 2008 | Gunnery Sgt. Jason J. Bortz

The Hammurabi Training Center held a ribbon cutting ceremony here today to celebrate the opening of a permanent training center for Iraqi Police officers.

 For the past year, the Hammurabi Training Center had to move around to different sites and didn’t have a permanent home. Now, officers in the Iraqi Police have a place to come and train.

 While at the training center, IP officers will receive a variety of training to include criminal investigation, logistics and leadership courses. The unique part of the training at the Hammurabi Training Center is who leads the training.

 “All of the classes are taught by Iraqis,” said Sgt. 1st Class John Drummond, operations noncommissioned officer, Police Implementation Office, 170th Military Police Company. “This is the only center in the region that does that.”

 The opening of the center is another huge step toward Iraq becoming a more stable nation.

 “Today is a very important day for the people of western Al Anbar,” said Lt. Col. Robert McCarthy, executive officer, Regimental Combat Team 5, during the ceremony. “We officially opened the Hammurabi Training Center where Iraqi Police will train Iraqi Police for the greater good of western Al Anbar.”

 The instructors will still have International Police Advisors to assist with the training, but the IPAs will now take a more backseat role.

 “The IPAs will now act as monitors from the back of the classroom,” said Drummond.

 Classes at the center will range between four and eight days depending on the course, and the center has living quarters for the officers to stay while here.

 “This center is where the process of developing leaders takes place,” said Gary Van Auken, senior IPA, Region 4.

 After completing a course, the officers are given the classes on CDs so that they may take what they learned and spread it to their fellow police officers.

 The special guest for the ceremony was Col. Shaaban Barzan Hamryn Sadyh, chief of police for Baghadi. He talked of the hardships of being a police officer in Iraq, but stressed the importance of it.

 “Bring the criminals to justice, even if its your own brother,” said Shaaban.