Unit HomeUnits5TH MARINE REGT
U.S. Navy HM3 Ruben De La Torre, a corpsman with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, posts security during the Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation (MCCRE) on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Sept. 21, 2019. 5th Marines conducted a regimental-sized MCCRE that included 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, and the Regimental Headquarters to increase the combat proficiency and readiness of the regiment. The MCCRE took place over a 10-day period and served as a proof of concept for future regimental-sized MCCREs. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Alexa M. Hernandez)
U.S. Marines and a U.S. Navy Corpsman with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participate in a simulated casualty evacuation during the Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation (MCCRE) on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Sept. 18, 2019. 5th Marines conducted a regimental-sized MCCRE that included 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, and the Regimental Headquarters to increase the combat proficiency and readiness of the regiment. The MCCRE took place over a 10-day period and served as a proof of concept for future regimental-sized MCCREs. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Alexa M. Hernandez)
U.S. Marines with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, hike up a hill during the Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation (MCCRE) on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Sept. 23, 2019. 5th Marines conducted a regimental-sized MCCRE for 1st Battalion, 5th Marines and 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, as well as the Regimental Headquarters to increase the combat proficiency and readiness of the regiment. The MCCRE took place over a 10 day period and served as proof of concept for future regimental-sized MCCREs. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Alexa M. Hernandez)
U.S Marines and Sailors with Echo Company, 2nd battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division conduct Bastard FEX III at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Aug. 14, 2019. Bastard FEX III is an opportunity for the Marines to conduct offensive and defensive operations at the platoon and company levels in preparation for future deployments. (U.S. Marine Corps video by Sgt. Mason Roy)
U.S. Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Shane Armstrong, an artillery cannon operator with 5th Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, checks a stack of M270 rockets during exercise Steel Knight (SK) 19 at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Dec. 7, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Audrey M. C. Rampton)
A U.S. Marine Corps M142 High-mobility artillery rocket system fires a M270 rocket during exercise Steel Knight (SK) 19 at Army Facility Dugway Proving Ground, Utah, Dec. 7, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Audrey M. C. Rampton)
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Ramon Trevino, an infantry Marine with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participates in a decontamination drill during Steel Knight 2019 (SK19) on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., Dec. 06, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
U.S. Marine Corps LCpl. Jeremy Yeager, a machine gunner with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participates in a simulated air assault during Steel Knight 2019 (SK19) on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., Dec. 05, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participate in a simulated air assault during Steel Knight 2019 (SK19) on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., Dec. 05, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Ramon Trevino, an infantry Marine with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participates in a training flight in preparation for Steel Knight 2019 on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., Nov. 27, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
A U.S. Marine with the 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment participates in a training flight in preparation for Steel Knight 2019 on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Nov. 27, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and thinking opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
News
The Highlanders celebrate 30 years of glory

By Staff Sgt. Bobbie Curtis | 1st Marine Division | July 7, 2015

SHARE

Every year around midsummer, about midday, you can spot an arguably peculiar event beginning to form up in the thick grassy plains and dirt roads leading from the Los Pulgas area of Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif.

Down the path the entire 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, led by a bagpiper, comes marching in a scene reminiscent of the Royal Scots Fusiliers in the Great War as they head to Red Beach, an area used for the Marine Corps’ forte: amphibious operations and training. And when they get to the beach they begin to compete in games and feast in true warrior fashion. 

The tradition, known as the Highlander Games Warrior Night, was instituted in 1998 and corresponds with the Battalion’s anniversary. It pays homage to the traditions of the famous Scottish Soldiers of the past after whom the battalion is nicknamed, the Highlanders.

To celebrate the battalion’s 30th Anniversary, festivities kicked off with a rededication ceremony highlighting the combat unit’s short but illustrious battle history.

During the precisely executed ceremony, Lt. Col. Christian M. Rankin, the battalion’s commanding officer, stood before a formation of the four companies that comprise his unit and attached the battle streamers the unit has earned to the battalion’s organizational colors. 

A bell rang in honor of the men who have lost their lives in service to their nation as part of the battalion.

“Today is about reflection – reflecting on our purpose, reflecting on our history, reflecting on those who came before us, and reflecting on the future,” stated Rankin as he addressed his men and the guest who attended the event.

He added that the annual time for reflection was not only to think about history and sacrifice, but also a way for his Marines and Sailors to feel a connection to the unit’s forefathers, and to define the obligation they have to those who will follow in their own footsteps.

“Please think about this for a moment: if we as human beings – as Marines and Sailors – have no connection with or need for those who have come before us, and if we have no responsibility or obligation to those who come after us, then our personal and professional lives would have little meaning,” he said.

Shortly after the speech, the battalion formed up and moved out to the sound of bagpipes, marching approximately three miles to the beach, where they conducted several friendly competitions.

Games included grappling, a Humvee pull, tug-o-war, and the culminating event: the caber toss. During this event, a heavy pole is thrown for distance.

After completing the games, the Marines and Sailors enjoyed a camaraderie-filled atmosphere around a bonfire while feasting on barbeque and listing to live music as played by a local Irish-Scottish-style rock band.


SHARE
Videos
Embed
Share
Jordanian Frogmen, Italian EOD and U.S. Sailors Conduct Multilateral Demolition Operations Training
Task Force 51/5th Marine Expeditionary Brigade
Sept. 1, 2019 | 2:29
CAMP TITIN, JORDAN (September 1, 2019) U.S. Navy Sailors with Task Force 56, Italian EOD and Jordanian Frogmen conducted multilateral demolition operations training in support of Exercise Eager Lion 2019. Eager Lion, U.S. Central Command’s largest and most complex exercise, is an opportunity to integrate forces in a multilateral environment, operate in realistic terrain, and strengthen military-to-military relationships. (U.S. Navy video by LT Ryan Slattery)
More
Mission
The 5th Marine Regiment mans, trains and equips battalions, detachments, and individuals to deploy in support of our national security needs while maintaining a high state of readiness and professionally develops our Marines and Sailors to respond to crisis and/or contingencies when the nation calls.
COMMAND PHILOSOPHY

Our unit enjoys a long and distinguished heritage.  Generations of Marines

achieved its status as the Corps' most decorated regiment over a century of

combat in every clime and place.  We will build on the foundation laid by

our predecessors to forge a team that will be successful in combat and add

luster to the regiment's reputation.  The following guidance is intended to

explain my leadership philosophy and orient our individual and collective

energies.

Command Philosophy

5th Marine Regiment Leaders

Col. Rob Weiler
Commanding Officer, 5th Marine Regiment
VIEW BIO

Sergeant Major Justin L. Stokes
Sergeant Major, 5th Marine Regiment
VIEW BIO
Contact

5th Marine Regiment
PO BOX 555452
Camp Pendleton, CA 92055-5452

Duty Officer: 
760-763-8066

Camp Pendleton
Directory Assistance:
760-725-4111

UNIT MEMBER EMAIL ACCESS

Share Point Link:  https://eis.usmc.mil/sites/5mar/


    Links

     

     

     

     Report Suspicious Activity