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U.S. Navy HM3 Ruben De La Torre, a corpsman with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, posts security during the Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation (MCCRE) on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Sept. 21, 2019. 5th Marines conducted a regimental-sized MCCRE that included 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, and the Regimental Headquarters to increase the combat proficiency and readiness of the regiment. The MCCRE took place over a 10-day period and served as a proof of concept for future regimental-sized MCCREs. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Alexa M. Hernandez)
U.S. Marines and a U.S. Navy Corpsman with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participate in a simulated casualty evacuation during the Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation (MCCRE) on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Sept. 18, 2019. 5th Marines conducted a regimental-sized MCCRE that included 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, and the Regimental Headquarters to increase the combat proficiency and readiness of the regiment. The MCCRE took place over a 10-day period and served as a proof of concept for future regimental-sized MCCREs. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Alexa M. Hernandez)
U.S. Marines with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, hike up a hill during the Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation (MCCRE) on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Sept. 23, 2019. 5th Marines conducted a regimental-sized MCCRE for 1st Battalion, 5th Marines and 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, as well as the Regimental Headquarters to increase the combat proficiency and readiness of the regiment. The MCCRE took place over a 10 day period and served as proof of concept for future regimental-sized MCCREs. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Alexa M. Hernandez)
U.S Marines and Sailors with Echo Company, 2nd battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division conduct Bastard FEX III at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Aug. 14, 2019. Bastard FEX III is an opportunity for the Marines to conduct offensive and defensive operations at the platoon and company levels in preparation for future deployments. (U.S. Marine Corps video by Sgt. Mason Roy)
U.S. Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Shane Armstrong, an artillery cannon operator with 5th Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, checks a stack of M270 rockets during exercise Steel Knight (SK) 19 at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Dec. 7, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Audrey M. C. Rampton)
A U.S. Marine Corps M142 High-mobility artillery rocket system fires a M270 rocket during exercise Steel Knight (SK) 19 at Army Facility Dugway Proving Ground, Utah, Dec. 7, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Audrey M. C. Rampton)
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Ramon Trevino, an infantry Marine with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participates in a decontamination drill during Steel Knight 2019 (SK19) on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., Dec. 06, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
U.S. Marine Corps LCpl. Jeremy Yeager, a machine gunner with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participates in a simulated air assault during Steel Knight 2019 (SK19) on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., Dec. 05, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participate in a simulated air assault during Steel Knight 2019 (SK19) on Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., Dec. 05, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Ramon Trevino, an infantry Marine with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, participates in a training flight in preparation for Steel Knight 2019 on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., Nov. 27, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st Marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
A U.S. Marine with the 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment participates in a training flight in preparation for Steel Knight 2019 on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Nov. 27, 2018. SK19 is an annual training exercise and assesses the 1st marine Division’s ability to conduct ground combat operations against a peer or near-peer adversary. The exercise challenges the division’s commanders, staff, and units in a dynamic in a dynamic scenario against a reactive and thinking opposing force to refine the units’ command and control, interoperability, and fundamental warfighting skills. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Rhita Daniel)
News
Atlanta Marine joins for pride in country

By Lance Cpl. Christopher J. Moore | | December 20, 2013

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Many believe leaders are not born, they are made, but Marines who served with Sgt. Wesley Adams said he is a natural when it comes to leadership.

Adams, a vehicle commander with Delta Company, 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, joined the Marine Corps when he graduated high school because of pride in his country and his willingness to sacrifice everything for his loved ones.

“When the twin towers got hit I wasn’t old enough to go,” said Adams, a native of Atlanta. “I still had a year of high school. I joined because I just wanted to fight for my country.”

Adams, who deployed to Iraq twice, has held a leadership position for nearly his entire eight years in the Marine Corps. As a lance corporal, he earned the billet of fire team leader and moved up to section leader. He became a vehicle commander 10 months ago and plans on making a career out of the Marine Corps. His duties consist of calling out fire missions for the mortar section, keeping track of all personnel, serialized gear, food and water. Maintaining the vehicle is also an important part of the job.

“A lot of time and effort goes into these vehicles,” Adams said. “They are not easy to maintain. There’s a lot of work that goes into them to keep them running well, making sure they are cleaned, and all the insides and outs are working properly. It’s a lot of work.”

As a vehicle commander, communication with his Marines and the other vehicles during a mission is important. They need to coordinate their movements to complete the mission. If they can’t talk to one another, they are not going to know the next step.

Communication is also important between Adams and his Marines on a daily basis. As a sergeant, it is his responsibility to look after their welfare. He always helps out when he can and is a natural when it comes to mentoring and guiding his Marines, said Lance Cpl. Ryan Tallman, an LAV crewman with Delta Co.

“I look up to him as one of the best leaders we have in Delta Company,” Tallman said. “He doesn’t just do his job and go home, he helps other Marines with their job when they’re having a hard time. Anything that we need as junior Marines, he does his best to help us out as much as possible.”

Adams an approachable style of leadership to let Marines know they can come to him for anything. If he doesn’t have the answers they are looking for, he will find it. He enjoys being around his Marines, listening to their hometown experiences, what they would do if they won the lottery and the funny stories they have to tell, he said.

“I just like to sit back and listen,” said Adams. “I think being a more approachable leader, Marines feel they can come up to me and talk about anything and I feel appreciated for that. I think ruling with an iron fist doesn’t get too many Marines anywhere. I try to be as understanding as possible.”

Adams will continue to lead his Marines when they deploy with a Marine expeditionary unit next summer. He is confident they are prepared to deploy anywhere in world at any-time.


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Jordanian Frogmen, Italian EOD and U.S. Sailors Conduct Multilateral Demolition Operations Training
Task Force 51/5th Marine Expeditionary Brigade
Sept. 1, 2019 | 2:29
CAMP TITIN, JORDAN (September 1, 2019) U.S. Navy Sailors with Task Force 56, Italian EOD and Jordanian Frogmen conducted multilateral demolition operations training in support of Exercise Eager Lion 2019. Eager Lion, U.S. Central Command’s largest and most complex exercise, is an opportunity to integrate forces in a multilateral environment, operate in realistic terrain, and strengthen military-to-military relationships. (U.S. Navy video by LT Ryan Slattery)
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Mission
The 5th Marine Regiment mans, trains and equips battalions, detachments, and individuals to deploy in support of our national security needs while maintaining a high state of readiness and professionally develops our Marines and Sailors to respond to crisis and/or contingencies when the nation calls.
COMMAND PHILOSOPHY

Our unit enjoys a long and distinguished heritage.  Generations of Marines

achieved its status as the Corps' most decorated regiment over a century of

combat in every clime and place.  We will build on the foundation laid by

our predecessors to forge a team that will be successful in combat and add

luster to the regiment's reputation.  The following guidance is intended to

explain my leadership philosophy and orient our individual and collective

energies.

Command Philosophy

5th Marine Regiment Leaders

Col. Rob Weiler
Commanding Officer, 5th Marine Regiment
VIEW BIO

Sergeant Major Justin L. Stokes
Sergeant Major, 5th Marine Regiment
VIEW BIO
Contact

5th Marine Regiment
PO BOX 555452
Camp Pendleton, CA 92055-5452

Duty Officer: 
760-763-8066

Camp Pendleton
Directory Assistance:
760-725-4111

UNIT MEMBER EMAIL ACCESS

Share Point Link:  https://eis.usmc.mil/sites/5mar/


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