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Marines sacrificing in more ways than one

31 Dec 2008 | Lance Cpl. Jerry Murphy

Deployed service members sacrifice more than just time away from home, they find ways to give to communities back home and around the world through the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC). 

Marines of Headquarters Company, Regimental Combat Team 1, made donations to the campaign totaling $6,002 from 43 contributors, which exceeds the company’s goal of $5,700 and averages to just over $140 per person.

Ensign Peter Bruss, a 33-year-old Information Operations officer from Green Bay, Wis., with Regimental Combat Team 1, served as the CFC coordinator for the regiment during the recent campaign from Sept. 1 through Dec. 15.

“Most of the Marines (with the company) have been out here almost a year and the fact that they are willing to donate despite being in Iraq and away from their families is a true testament of their dedication and willingness to help others,” Bruss said. “These Marines find it in their hearts to give a little bit out of their paychecks every month and that’s what the CFC is all about.”

Administered by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, the CFC allows federal employees an opportunity to provide monetary donations to their choice of more than 1400 charitable organizations.  

According to Bruss, it is easy for federal employees to contribute to the campaign; all they have to do is contact their unit’s campaign key worker to get the process started.

“Any federal employee is eligible to donate through the CFC and one of the best ways (federal employees) find out about the CFC is through word-of-mouth,” he said. “They can also talk to their unit’s CFC coordinator or key people, and the internet is also a great source of information.”
Bruss said contributors have the choice of making a one-time cash donation or having an allotment taken out of their paychecks.

“All you have to do is choose which charity you want to give your money to and fill out the form. You can give as little as $1 if you want,” Bruss said.

Bruss added that it is usually not hard to choose a charity to donate to because most people can relate to one or more charities in some way or another.

“There are thousands of charities to choose from and many relate to (most individuals),” said Bruss. “I can open the booklet to a page and at least a few of them can relate to me.”

For more information about the CFC, visit the campaign’s Web site at www.opm.gov/CFC or contact your unit’s campaign key worker.